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haven't followed the mayor wanted name, but if you look at labor, the environment playing out that way, a variety of social and cultural issues is always, importantly health care you mentioned is always the same coalition for certain stability there and a huge overlap and that's a terrific thing. >> is this interesting paper we see as part of the larger process of reallocation between state and federal government. how much leeway to see up on that administration have? i don't find very -- that would be fine if you had 2 million dvd agents is better than we do have, but how much room does the lord gave you? >> i think what all their shows as federalism is alive and well is the real of 60 kind of wandered the concepts in our country for obvious reasons, but even that term now is coming to be embraced by newer generation of something positive because you see controversial issues as you identified the address of the state level. that's a good thing happening here. it's easy when you're middle-aged man like me to brood about. the rule of law, what are we going to do? but we've had a lot of
elsewhere. alaska is not hospitable environment. ed markey is running nomnation in liberal state. picking up green group nominations. that same day the league of conservation voters. i think more about that, than anything else. for him to be shocked people respond to tax policy is itself shocking. melissa: if you tax something, it is meant to discourage whatever behavior that is. shell responded and said while we're aware of the tax environment wherever we operate the driver for our operational decisions is going to be governed by safety. the tax policy in question i would add, by the way is that they were think of drilling on the outer continental shelf, there you would pay regular federal corporate income tax of 35%. otherwise, they were paying the alaska production tax which can be as high as 75%. i say if they were moving it for tax reasons they should just own it and get out in front of it. what is wrong with that? so you're moving it to go drill in a spot or keep it in a spot that is going to provide a better tax environment for you. this is company. isn't that what they're supposed to
industry. together we put in place a stronger environment in which the private sector can create good paying jobs, and virginia is now outperforming its neighboring states. we have also worked hard together to get our fiscal house in order. three years ago, together we closed a budget shortfall of $6 billion without raising taxes. the results were good. we have had three consecutive budget surpluses totaling $1.40 billion. we more than doubled the rainy day fund. we gave two 3% performance bonuses to our great state employees. we have maintained virginia aaa bond rating while the federal government was losing theirs. we bolstered agency efficiency. we eliminated and consolidated dozens of boards and commissions and agencies and programs to save money. we set priorities and cut spending. in the last three years, i have recommended and you have accepted cuts and reallocations of spending of more than a billion dollars, and i thank you for that. we have made government live within its means. we put the most defunding into transportation since 1986 and stayed within zero or five%, self-im
environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start this seminar. i am happy to answer any other questions. i did not do this all by myself. i had a lot of individuals who helped me with this data. this research is all funded by the national research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with you, doctor. >> i would punt that one right over to david
for years in the economy, and even our environment. as increased use of natural gas has reduced co2 emissions in the united states in 1992 levels. since 1990, the industry has invested more than $252 billion in improving the environmental performance of our products, our facilities, and our operations. between 2000-2010, the amount of industry investment for technologies to reduce greenhouse gases was $71 billion. compare that to the $43 billion spent by the federal government over that same time. compared to all other industries combined, which were just slightly larger than what our industry invested. u.s. refiners have invested more than $137 billion since 1990 in technologies to produce even cleaner fuels and meet the growing variety of state and federal mandates. it complete transitions compared to gasoline is estimated to have resulted in the reduction of tailpipe emissions by cars and light duty trucks, the equivalent of taking 164 million cars off the road. and through increased efficiency, we are doing much more with less. america uses about half as much energy today to pro
and how to give actionable advice requires knowing, and i would argue working in, environments that require close cooperation. that is why our job is not to wait for legal questions to be brought to us or to provide advice on operational decisions after those decisions have been made. our job is to be present at the beginning and throughout the process. just like other senior national security official across the government, the person in my seat, since the creation of nsd, has attended the morning terrorism threat briefing along with the attorney-general and the director of the fbi. just like the analysts and special agents who are working these issues, we aim to stay on top of the threat picture and to help devise tactics and strategies and tools for getting ahead of it. today its standard -- it is standard procedure for agents conducting counterterrorism investigations to consult throughout the process with attorneys and prosecutors in the national security division. that is to ensure that all potential avenues for destruction of a threat, intelligence gathering, investigati
fourchlg the taliban, to try to reshape the environment there, and to try to maneuver the various players in the region towards negotiated outcome because there was no military outcome. that seems not to have gone well. in the absence of that, what is the strategic course? the strategic course is now to minimize american vulnerability in these areas. not walk afrom afghanistan, as has happened in the past. try to give afghanistan some choices, but for security and to try to get away from what i think is the free riding problem where president obama is free riding on security, and not moving governments forward to get other stake holding in the rest of the country. i think the president has moved that security blanket in part to change the dynamic in the region. he is also committed to rebalancing attention on asia, and he is taking military forces out should they be needed for iran and other matters. this is a very shrewd, smart move that i think the wlous is making. >> now, what we're seeing here, as well, is that they -- we just -- we're told that there's a two-minute warning. they do n
competitive environment from which to go out and compete around the world and win. host: one thing we heard leading up to discussions late last year is that some type of certainty was needed from decisions made. did the people you represent find the guest: certainty there is some of it. much is to be done because long- term overhang is still serious. nobody believes that our current spending course is sustainable. we have made promises that cannot be paid for. maybe not tomorrow or five years from now, but down the road changes need to be made. you're seeing this at the state level where governors and in both parties and legislative bodies are coming together. watch illinois right now, they are struggling with their pension debt, but at the national level we have not had the success yet that some of the states of had. host: looking at spending federally, what has to be guest::the first quarter this year is one that debate will take place. you have the debt ceiling, a continuing resolution. at the end of march, the year is half over. did you have sequestration mandated. those are all intertw
's hard to study the squid because of its harsh environment, but the discovery channel will air a program on their findings later this month. looks like that would be right up your ?ee. yeah, and very clear video. i like that. >> very clear. that's like a monster scwirksd like you want to get out of the way. >> a little creepy, but that's good. okay, 50 today so above average. nothing crazy, but above average. but kind of troubling, because we've had so few days below freezing at national and downtown. could we have a false spring? here's a picture sent to us by mike. it's a crocus coming up, or snowdrops, if you prefer. this is a month or two ahead of schedule. it is not going to be a disaster if it turns cold again and snows. these guys can handle it. but the sign here is if other plants sort of start doing the same thing and it does get dhoocialtiond cab causes some damage. so hopefully we will get the thing turned around to a more normal pattern. we've got to have winter at some point in time. it will also help the flu, by the way. winds will become northwesterly 10 to 15 after the co
care, but economics, education, climate change, the environment. i think you see a lot of different opinions and thoughts and ideas of how to get sun and how we find compromise in the united states senate. >> host: how did that play out in the number of leadership roles in congress? >> guest: is a great place to be. we have a new number and then in the senate serving as chairs of committees. in fact, senator barbara mikulski is the first woman to serve as the chair of the powerful appropriations committee and how that would change dynamics of the committee will see in the years to come. dianne feinstein in charge of intelligence. barbara boxer, more and more. patty murray goes through the list on budgets. and on the high side, we now have seven women ranking on major committees in the house. i should remind you that the house republicans a course in the majority have zero win in sharing any major committees. in fact, they are all white and cherry age or communities that have one women sharing a minor committee and that happens to be the administration committee. so we feel we are in
, these are women who have either come out of this environment, out of an urban center in particular. we have our own struggles in the rural parts of america. we need to bring these things to the discussion. that is what we need to do. i do not think we will find solutions to the questions that the caller had until we get those people living with the struggles of the table. that means more women, more african-americans, more hispanics, more men and women of color. i feel strongly that we need more women in this discussion. we're still sitting at 20% of congress. we have a long way to go. host: caller in richmond, democrats line. caller: i was wondering how we will ever get equal pay when states like virginia have the right to work law and they can fire you for any reason. and the company i work for, if you discuss what you make to another employee, you can get fired. guest: it is about laws. laws are made by elected officials. who is representing us at the state legislature and in congress matters. we can overturn right to work laws. and we can pass it will pay laws. we need the right people to s
afghanistan will have the right environment for conducting elections without interference and without undue concern. we also discussed in a bit of detail and in the environment that we have all aspects of the bilateral security agreement between afghanistan and the united states, and i informed the president that the afghan people already have given their approval to this relationship and value it as one that is good for afghanistan. in that context, the bilateral security agreement is one that the afghan people approve, and i am sure we will conduct it in detail where both the interests of the united states and the interests of afghanistan will be kept in mind. we had a number of other issues also to talk about during our conversations, and perhaps many times in that conversation, beginning with the composition of, of course.-- the conversation, of course. i thanked the president for the help that the united states has given to the afghan people for all that we have gained in the past 10 years and that those gains will be kept by any standard while we're working for peace and stability in
in the ecosystem. >> basically it's come to this. the environment where these pythons now live is not used to them. these creatures have evolved from places like the rainforest in southeast asia or the african savannah, and the habitat or the grassland habitat that you find in the everglades just simply is not equipped to deal with these very new and very invasive species. basically these pythons are invaders, and they are eating everything they come in contact with. >> you say these very new, are these pythons that were people's pets? >> likely that's how all of this originated. pot past 30 years people have been importing these snakes. a lot less lately. but during the 1970s and 1980s thousands and thousands of these snakes were brought in from asia and africa, and more often than not they either escaped because of hurricanes or people released them into environments where they shouldn't have, and these animals took over. they started out as pets, and then through negligence were released and, unfortunately, this ecosystem just really is not prepared to take on what these snakes do to the enviro
that environment or because some folks use television as something to unwind with and so they didn't particularly care to spend their time in that world in that way. however, many folks felt as though the story was told truthfully and clearly and without apology. that is what we have been told. i am talking about folks in law enforcement. i am talking about judges and attorneys. also politicians, as well as folks whose lives were depicted by some of the street characters. they felt that someone was fighting for them and gay-rights c-span: we saw you when you testified in baltimore, i believe it was at the attorney general's task force, let's watch this clip and kept up with your story. >> i remember lying in bed as i heard an argument growing and my parents bedroom. only to remember the deafening sound of my mother's jaw being crushed. i remember her head on the kitchen chopping block and my father holding a knife to her throat and my mother asking to be put out of her misery. our member asking my father to stop and not make mommy cried. i was two years old. that was the pattern that made me feel
, patty murray, borba boxer, chair of the environment. we have seven women now on the democratic side that are ranking members, and on the republican sign, every major committee is led by a white mail. in -- white male. in fact there's only one woman chairing a minor committee, and they fav her administration. what does this mean? women's leadership changes the conversation at these negotiations tables. there's a story of serving on the house armed services committee, and when they were talking about military reddiness, she and women like gabby giffords were there to ask questions about personnel and supplies, but also about mental health programs for the troops and their families at home. all of which is important for military readiness. and so you can't tell me that if we had two or three women involved in this fiscal cliff debate in the last month, that we wouldn't have gotten it done faster. i was at home over the holidays with my dad, and we all knew where we would end up. there were going to be tax increases. may have been at 300,000 or 4 hon thousand. there wasn't an american i
better in private. and it is as free as possible from early judgment so that you create an environment around learn in. >> my name is david sherman from the american federation of teachers. i want to say that the american federation of teachers, as was mentioned, was very involved in the development of the common core, not we as an organization, but hundreds of teachers around the country. we support it with every fiber of our being. we want to see it work. but we are very nervous. we are mainly norris -- nervous because what we are hearing from all over the country' with few exceptions is that teachers are not being prepared or given the right kind of professional development. they have a few days of the workshop. but teachers, and frankly, parents, are just not being prepared. i do have a question. since there is no teacher voice here, and going to take a moment if you do not mind. just a minute. the fact of the matter is, teachers are very supportive of the common core. teachers all across the country, but they want help to do it the right way, and they are not getting it. the feder
in afghanistan? thank you. >> the interment of the -- environment of the narcotrafficker forces in uncertainty. when they raise an orchard or vineyard and turns it into a poppy field -- when he is not sure what is learned happened to him or his family, they turn to narcotics. it takes three months to grow it. it does not need refrigeration or economic integration, nothing. if we see an increased degree of uncertainty, we would probably see more poppy cultivation. it would be listed economic activities. -- illicit economic activities. the leadership [indiscernible] in the areas where the economy is thriving, we have seen a reduction of narcotics and cultivation of the poppy. in areas where we see most of the fighting, that is where most of the poppies are grown. >> let me close with a final question. jim used a number of statistics. one that struck me is i have the right to a 52% of the afghan population thought the country is going on in the right direction. my question to each of you, what is your view? is the country going in the right direction and are you optimistic or pessimistic as we lo
on some gun measures. what's clear here is the political environment in washington, we've seen over the last several months, how it's been very difficult to get movement on anything that goes down to the wire for lawmakers to come up with some sort of bipartisan agreement. what the vice president is spelling out here, is floating, essentially he's talking about the reality of the current political climate here in washington. yes, there are things that can be done legislatively. but if those things can't be done, then the president is willing to act alone. why? because he says it's time to act no now. >> i want to make it clear that we are not going to get caught up in the notion, unless we can do everything we'll do nothing. it's critically important that we act. >> in addition to these meetings that you spelled out earlier that the vice president is holding today, yesterday he also met with some faith leaders. they talked about the moral imperative to act quickly. he also had a conference call with governors, other stated and local officials across the country. they're really tryin
. >> plus, saving room, money and the environment. you don't have it, you don't have a compose. stick around for derek thomas's tips for going green. >> are we still talking poo? we'll be right back. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios ...and now... you! [ giggles ] ♪ the one and only, cheerios >>> rumors are flying about facebook. sent out invites for an event january 15th that reads come and see what we're building. insiders are speculating facebook may be introducing own smart phone or a new operating system. >> oh, geez. toddlers could soon be doing web surfing while on the pottie. behold the ipotty. unveiled at the show in las vegas. high tech take on toilet training that has an attachment for the ipad. go on sale in march. it will sell for just about $40. >> i don't want my ipad. >> don't want your ipad near any of that stuff. >> no. i don't know how it really works. >> that needs to go down as not a good idea. >> i don't get it. why would you? >> r
of politicians, current and former, have joined forces to create a partisan-free environment, and called "no labels" they are pledged to a simple obligation, stop fight ing and start fixing. will the compromise and chances for success be for no label? we are joined by former presidential candidate jon huntsman and congressman joe manchin next. bacon? -oh! -oh! oh! [ female announcer ] with 40 delicious progresso soups at 100 calories or less, there are plenty of reasons people are saying "progress-oh!" share your story for a chance to win a progress-oh! makeover in hollywood. go to facebook.com/progresso to enter. >>> with me now, senator joe manchin, democrat from west virginia and former presidential candidate and former utah governor jon huntsman, thank you for being here and joining forces here. i have to say when i was reading about this, and said, okay, goals to argue less and act more, and i'm thinking, yeah, but how do you go about that, particularly from the outside? why is an outside group needed? >> well, let me say from no labels' standpoint when i was a senator two years ago, i
learned to live in this environment. the reality is we have accepted what appears to be kick the can down the street politics. >> neil: what would you and your fellow ceos do and have a credible debt fix, you probably would have a heart attack, but what would you do? >> it would allow us to feel more secure where we're going. we need to know the rules of the game. that is what we're asking for. i think we as citizens and not business people first. the reality is we know the problems, debt and immigration and reality as a nation when we compete against nation states, how are we going to compete if we can't solve these problems? the issue is not the debt ceiling. the issue is the fundamental core problems of the country and the inability of our congressional leaders and our political class to actually solve them. >> neil: how is it that you are home to some of best? >> they are good for you. >> neil: ron shaich, just a message from wall street. okay. did you hear the one about teacher did not like her students and thoughts about a phobia that is now a lawsuit. we're going try this. what do
returning service members to have a drink with mom and dad. advocates said if it's in a safe environment, why not? colorado just legalized recreationality marijuana. is the rocky mountain state on the road to moral ruins? are they on to something here? i think the compare to marijuana and alcohol is not accurate. marijuana is much safer than alcohol. i do reject that compare and this is hardly the top of my priority list in terms of things i want our legislators to focus on. i don't have a problem with the idea of people over 18 with their parents and have their consent being able to have a drink. i don't have a problem with the age being lowered to 18 to be quite honest. doesn't rank at top of my priors, but i don't have an issue with it. >> going after lowering the age, that's an interesting idea. i would be open to it. this to me seems different. first of all, is colorado so flushed with cash and overemployment that this is on the top of their priority list? really? i don't appreciate the way that this republican senator seems to attempt to wrap this issue in the flag. let's play it q
-- a hospital operating room so they would have to have the ventilation system for a sterile environment even though one is not needed to perform an abortion. they would have to have regulated widths for hallways and doors for abortion clinics. and this is another one that is rather interesting, there would be a minimum number of parking spaces required for abortion clinics. so these are all sort of the nitpicky ways that conservatives have used, you know, local laws, state laws, to restrict a woman's right to access to preventative care. >> and, you know, maria teresa, to jonathan's point, many of these clinics that so upset social conservatives offer, as you know, a wide variety of health service. for instance, screenings for various kinds of cancer. what is it about helping often poor single women that so upsets conservatives? >> well, i think you hit the nail on the head, martin. the conservative folks going after a woman's right to choose, and it's the extreme right, they are basically talking both sides of their mouth. at the same time they don't want preventative care. they don't want
around? >> i believe the atmosphere has changed. the environment u i think there's a good chance that we can push a positive agenda forward. if this doesn't do it, if this newtown tragedy doesn't do it, i'm not sure what will. we just need to search our hearts and our souls and ask if there's not more we can do to prevent this sort of thing. and i think most mirns sense that. most americans are willing to think about some new ways of approaching this. of course, we need some political leadership and some leaders to encourage us to come together on this. >> congressman, you're from north carolina and polling says that the public is understanding it is moving toward more of a sensible gun control kind of country. but what about your colleagues in the congress? are you hearing or sensing any movement there? one of their colleagues was shot and we didn't see any movement there. why should we feel something would be different this time? >> well, i have to say that congress is more polarized and more stuck on talking points than i've ever seen in my time there. but i do believe if you just sto
that the compromises are going to happen, too. host koza what do we do to sort of create the environment now that promotes compromise? is it possible -- is it just something that happens when a nation is creative and not any nation as continued? >> guest: there have been a lot of times in history. i think the constitution is a very good -- i call it in the book an engine of compromise that propels us towards compromise and one of the ways it does it is it is used to shut the whole thing down, but it's for any government a couple of people in congress can do it, a few people on the supreme court can do it. it's much easier to keep things from happening than to let things happen. what drives compromise is the need to do something, the need to move forward to get we are always going to have a lot of political theater, and i love that. i come at this with an anguish major with a background in theater. i love the theatrical elements of our politics. i think it's fascinating. it's a dramatic, its common and tragic. it's just a wonderful bit of literature. in the and the founding generation had a c
: what do we do to create the sort of environment now that promotes compromise? is it just something that happens when a nation is created, not when a nation is continued? >> guest: i think there have been a lot of times in our history, i think the constitution is a good dish call it in the book an engine of compromise. it propels us towards compromise, and one way is by making it easy to shut the whole thing down. it takes very little to bring government to a grinding halt. a couple of people in congress can do it. a president can do it. a few people on the supreme court can do it. it's much easier to keep things from happening than to make things happen, and what drives compromise is the need to do something. the need to move fur. i think that we have -- we always going to have a lot of political theater, and i love that. political -- i was an english major with a background in theater, and so i love the theatrical element of our politics. i think it's fascinating. i think it's dramatic, comic, tragic, a wonderful bit of literature. >> host: in the end, the founding generation had
. >> do you think there is a way we can do corporate reform in this environment? >> is extremely difficult but i think one really positive thing that came out of this fiscal debates this time is that for the first time in a long time, the business community unified around a concept of getting our deficit under control. they were not as worried about their individual tax breaks that might go as a result of having some reform. i hope that mood continues. that was a one group does not argue over one other or about accelerated depreciation and so forth. i am more hopeful that a more unified view from the business community is possible this time. >> i want to say one thing -- i'm not fully knowledgeable about this. i was at a meeting earlier today we're in noted tax expert said you cannot do corporate reform and not to individual reform because when we change the parameters, a whole lot of entities shifted from c corporations to other forms that were taxed on the individual side. if you lower rates on the corporate tax and get away with some of the preferences for oil and gas and various things
? that is a very rich interest level, in our current interest- rate environment. you have to wonder if the bank is not just holding on to your loan to maintain a high level of interest? but i wonder if this may be worth your while to try to go to another bank and not refinance with the same company. it has become a much more difficult circumstance to get a mortgage because the banks are still recovering from all of the bad loans that they made during the real-estate mania. >> one other issue that was brought up was the issue of debt-income ratio, and this is something richard spoke about and what he would do with the qualified loans. american hero joe says, what did he mean by 20% of the grossly month in come? explain this issue for us? >> this goes to the heart of the ability to repay the loan issue, that described a little bit ago. we don't want people taking on loans they cannot afford to repay, that leads us to problems. what they have decided is that 43% is the outside level, if your mortgage debt, plus or other debt, with car loans or consumer debt or credit cards, -- if your other obliga
to their environment, office furniture, software needed -- which nevwhenever thy to support the core for environment. at that time i was hired with the company. i was working seven days a week nonstop as all over corporations were installing $15 million systems like you would go out and buy a pack of gum. i think taxation against large corporations is what is part of our problem in this country right now. i believe if we would give them an incentive to be able to do that got onhighere and penalizing them for being successful, i think we would have a lot better environment economically. basically this all ties to the tax deductions that everyone is looking at, and i heard rumblings of a simple tax. well, we're not in a position right now to offer that. it sounds like a great idea, but something that would have to evolve over time. my point i am trying to make on the obama care thing, and i did not mention that, but i feel it they had a corporate tax, not a loophole, but basically a did nation tax, corporations could do a fund that would support a medical plan and the country, we would not have the co
? thank you. >> the interment of the -- environment of the narcotrafficker forces in uncertainty. when they raise an orchard or vineyard and turns it into a poppy field -- when he is not sure what is learned happened to him or his family, they turn to narcotics. it takes three months to grow it. it does not need refrigeration or economic integration, nothing. if we see an increased degree of uncertainty, we would probably see more poppy cultivation. it would be listed economic activities. -- illicit economic activities. the leaderships and international community. in the areas where the economy is thriving, we have seen a reduction of narcotics and cultivation of the poppy. in areas where we see most of the fighting, that is where most of the poppies are grown. >> let me close with a final question. jim used a number of statistics. one that struck me is i have the right to a 52% of the afghan population thought the country is going on in the right direction. my question to each of you, what is your view? is the country going in the right direction and are you optimistic or pessimistic
to create a partisan-free environment, and called "no labels" they are pledged to a simple proposition, stop fighting and start fixing. we'll discuss compromise and the chances for success with the no labels chairman, democratic senator joe manchin of west virginia and former republican governor of utah jon huntsman, next. she wants. now you can with new stayfree ultra thins. flexible layers move with your body, while thermocontrol wicks moisture away. keep moving. new stayfree. or treat gas with these after you get it. now that's like sunblock before or sun burn cream later. oh, somebody out there's saying, now i get it! take beano before and there'll be no gas. >>> with me now, senator joe manchin, democrat from west virginia and former presidential candidate and former utah governor jon huntsman, thank you both for being here, joining forces here. i have to say when i was reading about this, and said, okay, goals to argue less and act more, and i'm thinking, yeah, but how do you go about that, particularly from the outside? why is an outside group needed? >> well, let me say from no label
christians say the focus shouldn't be on gunnings but on the environment giving rise to this violence. >> instead of having as the nra proposes a policeman in every school, our policy should be focusing on getting a dad in every home. >> reporter: vice president biden said friday he's glad i n evangelical groups have participated in his gun policy task force meetings because in the past they have been, quote, reluctant to engage on the gun issue. athena jones, cnn, washington. >>> the president is promising action when it comes to curbing gun violence. the vice president even expected to endorse efforts to reinstate that assault weapons ban, but the opposition says that just isn't going to happen. t spot, not easy to find, but worth it. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better. and that means...fish on! symbicort is for copd includi
cars hurt the environment. science to push their agenda. .e choosing advil® because helps you keep doing what you love. no wonder it's america's #1 selling pain reliever. you took action, you took advil®. and we thank you. with hand-layered pasta, tomatoes, and real mozzarella cheese. but what makes us even prouder... is what our real dinners can do for your family. stouffer's. let's fix dinner. >>eric: extreme weather in jerusalem. the holy land getting a rare snowstorm that paralyzed the city. eight inches piling up on palm trees and streets. it's been over a decade since the last snowfall in the city. michael j. fox is ready for a comeback. he says his parkinson's is under control and he'll be returning to a new tv show where he plays a character who has parkinson's. >>alisyn: some people believe their environmental plans are scientifically sound but are they ignoring evidence when it does not back up their agenda? hank campbell is the founder of science 2.0 and cofounder of science left behind, feel-good fallacies in the rise of the anti-scientific left. let's talk about suppo
, that it would be a much safer environment? >> i -- i absolutely -- i wouldn't consider carrying one if i didn't feel like i could do it safely. >> but what if you had a parent who objected to it? what position would that put you in? >> well, in the state of utah, a parent doesn't have to know about it. teachers can carry a firearm and nobody ever -- they've been doing it for 12 years. i've found out more and more about teachers that do. and employee -- >> the teachers have had guns in schools for 12 years in utah? >> yes, yes. it's been legal to do that for 12 years. >> and parents haven't known about it? >> right. you don't have to tell if you're a concealed weapon holder. >> do you think parents have a right to know? for instance, if my child was in your classroom, do you think that i would have a right to know that there is a firearm in that classroom? >> well, if -- if -- i personally would feel okay with any of the teachers, teachers i know, any teach they're i've ever met. they have the -- >> but i'm talking about the parents. >> right, right. >> i want to focus. the parents are droppin
our national security needs are, and make cuts in the environment and housing and transportation, and i just believe that i'm better prepared having just done what i have done to do this. it's not that i'd be the best interim senator ever. just that in these particular circumstances with very complex issues as kind of a continuation, i'm there, and i believe it's very important for us to go after them, for example, on this phony, irresponsible issue on the debt limit and do defense, social security, and medicare. the two most successful anti-poverty programs in history. at a time when people say we have too much inequality, the notion you would increase in equality is nuts, and further -- look, i had some unhappiness when i read about chuck hagel's remarks from 14 years ago, which i didn't remember, but now the question is he's a man who is going to help us withdraw from afghanistan and reduce the military. i'm very encouraged by that. my one criticism of the president was he wasn't going far enough in reducing the military. i think people now understand that it's either keeping
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